Lunch Special Sandwich

available from 11AM til 4PM Daily

PORCHETTA

Caramelized onion, arugula lemon caper aioli, Bellegarde ciabatta

As we serve only the freshest ingredients seasonally, some items may not be available or may be substituted for above items.

**21 and over. We are a non smoking establishment. Service animals only please.

Seating is first come first served. We do not take reservations. 

We accept Visa, MC, Discover & Amex.

Cheese of the Week:  Clothbound Cheddar While age used to be the hallmark of a good (and expensive) cheddar, mongers and foodies alike are now looking at how a cheese is aged to help gauge a cheddar’s quality. Born in the middle ages in the town of Cheddar in Somerset, England, cheddar cheese is a decidedly UK invention. However, clothbound cheddar has a foggier, more disputed history. Recent historical evidence presents the idea that early U.S. colonists were the first to age their cheddar wrapped in cloth to guard against unpredictable New World weather utilizing a bountiful natural resource, cotton. Eventually though, wax coated cheddars became the rage. Cheesemakers began to favor this method because it protected the cheese so that each wheel required less time and care, cutting costs but also sacrificing flavor. Today, clothbound cheddars are typically made by smaller producers, due in large part to the lengthy, labor intensive process of aging it appropriately. While that means that clothbounds may cost a little more, it also means that they are often made of higher quality milk from healthier cows from more sustainable producers. These particular giant, 32 pound wheels are made by Cabot Creamery with pasteurized cow’s milk. They are aged up to 14 months at the Cellars at Jasper Hill in a partnership that revolutionized this recipe. Simple named “Clothbound Cheddar”, this is an approachable but complex cheddar with a crumbly texture and nutty aroma. The flavor is deeply savory and slightly tangy with caramel sweetness to the finish.

Cheese of the Week:  Clothbound Cheddar

While age used to be the hallmark of a good (and expensive) cheddar, mongers and foodies alike are now looking at how a cheese is aged to help gauge a cheddar’s quality. Born in the middle ages in the town of Cheddar in Somerset, England, cheddar cheese is a decidedly UK invention. However, clothbound cheddar has a foggier, more disputed history. Recent historical evidence presents the idea that early U.S. colonists were the first to age their cheddar wrapped in cloth to guard against unpredictable New World weather utilizing a bountiful natural resource, cotton. Eventually though, wax coated cheddars became the rage. Cheesemakers began to favor this method because it protected the cheese so that each wheel required less time and care, cutting costs but also sacrificing flavor. Today, clothbound cheddars are typically made by smaller producers, due in large part to the lengthy, labor intensive process of aging it appropriately. While that means that clothbounds may cost a little more, it also means that they are often made of higher quality milk from healthier cows from more sustainable producers. These particular giant, 32 pound wheels are made by Cabot Creamery with pasteurized cow’s milk. They are aged up to 14 months at the Cellars at Jasper Hill in a partnership that revolutionized this recipe. Simple named “Clothbound Cheddar”, this is an approachable but complex cheddar with a crumbly texture and nutty aroma. The flavor is deeply savory and slightly tangy with caramel sweetness to the finish.